Summer is a puta. I park
                                         beneath branches, crank up the AC                                                                                                                                         in the Jeep.
I hate the rearview mirror.
                  It makes me look like my father. Chaste                                                                                                                                 & singed. Last week,
beneath a sky Wal-Mart blue,
                                           in a clearing full of bottles, sneakers,                                                                                                                                                   TP rolls,
I found a body. Legs
                                           gnawed to the knees, barbed wire tight
                                                                                                                    around
the throat.
                                          I remembered graffiti
                                                                                                  on a boulder: God
is always hungry.
             Sometimes, with binoculars,
                                                                                                             I watch wild horses
hurry through the heat. Once
                                          a yearling stopped mid-gallop,
then collapsed
                                          into a bed of coals the rain could not extinguish.
                                                                                                                     The radio
is always crackling:
                                          six wets sighted on infrared,
                                                                                        need a spic speaker stat. . .
I only speak Spanish with my father.
                                          He often mistakes blue parakeets
                                                                                                                       perched
on the stove for gas flames.
                                                                            Last July, far from Tucson,

                                                                                                     I found a rape tree:
torn panties draped on branches.
                                           The tree a warning,
                                                                                                    a way for smugglers
to claim terrain.
          Lightning climbs a hillside like a stilt walker.
                                                                                 Rain
strikes the windshield.
                                          I think of my wife
                                                                                        asleep on her side. Breasts  
pressed together
                                         as if one were dreaming the other.                                                                                                                                           Her womb
empty.
          My dick useless.
                                   There are things I just can’t tell her.
Sometimes only body parts remain.
                                                            They’re buried
in baby caskets.