Glenn Reynoldsanother conservative bloggerBob VineyardNational Review Online Baltimore SunSunWeekly StandardMichelle Malkin
I just returned from a visit to Frost's commercial property near Patterson Park in Baltimore. It's a modest place. Talked to one of the tenants, Mike Reilly, who is a talented welder. He said he had known the Frosts for 10 years. Business is good, he told me, though he characterized Frost as 'struggling.' Reilly was an outspoken advocate for socialized health care without any means-testing whatsoever and an insistent critic of the Iraq war. Despite all that, he did agree with me that going without health insurance is often a matter of choice and a matter of priorities. Or maybe we were speaking two different languages.

I also passed by the Frosts' rowhouse. There was an '01-20-09' bumper sticker plastered on the door and a newer model GMC Suburban parked directly in front of the house. I've seen guesstimates of the house's worth in the $400,000-plus range. Those are high. But Mark Tapscott's point remains: '[P]eople make choices and it's clear the Frosts have made choice to invest in property and a business, but not in private health insurance. The Maryland-administered version of the federal SCHIP program, by the way, does not impose an asset test on applicants.
When a family and Democrat political leaders drag a child down to Washington at 6 in the morning to read a script written by Senate Democrat staffers on a crusade to overturn a presidential veto, someone might have questions about the family's claims. The newspapers don't want to do their jobs. The vacuum is being filled. If you don't want questions, don't foist these children onto the public stage. Fight your battles like adults and stop hiding behind youngsters dragging around red wagons filled with your talking points.
SunlaterDavid HerszenhornThe New York Times
As it turns out, the Frosts say, Graeme attends the private school on scholarship. The business that the critics said Mr. Frost owned was dissolved in 1999. The family's home, in the modest Butchers Hill neighborhood of Baltimore, was bought for $55,000 in 1990 and is now worth about $260,000, according to public records. And, for the record, the Frosts say, their kitchen counters are concrete.

Certainly the Frosts are not destitute. They also own a commercial property, valued at about $160,000, that provides rental income. Mr. Frost works intermittently in woodworking and as a welder, while Mrs. Frost has a part-time job at a firm that provides services to publishers of medical journals. Her job does not provide health coverage.
In a telephone interview, the Frosts said they had recently been rejected by three private insurance companies because of pre-existing medical conditions.
is also a private health insurance agent
I'm not sure why you would try and divert the issue away from the point of my blog, but that is your prerogative. Have a nice day.
UpdateEzraJonathan Cohn