make an omelet out of scrambled eggsanalysis
What I think Edwards has failed to understand is that he himself is one of the products placed on the market. A good politician understands this. He convinces the electorate not just of the problem and of the solution, but also that he is the person worthy of the public trust to implement the solution. He thus conforms his public image as closely to his message as possible--so that the voters believe that he will do what he says he will do, and therefore that he is worthy of the office they are about to bestow upon him. This is a major difference from Edwards' previous profession. A trial lawyer must "simply" sell a jury on the problem and the solution. He need not worry about whether the jury believes that he will implement its verdict. That is up to the judge. [snip] This means that--when you run for political office--you must conform your life to your political message as much as you are able. You must be the embodiment of the message that you are selling. Any small deviation or inconsistency--regardless of how irrelevant it objectively is--gives your opponent the opportunity to characterize you as untrustworthy, and therefore unworthy of the office you seek. [snip] Edwards' problem is not that he is a hypocrite per se. His problem is his lack of political insight, which allowed him to be tagged as one. He failed to realize that everything about him--including his house--would be subjected to public scrutiny, and that it all must conform to his message because, after all, the voters are judging him as much as his message.
I think Democrats are well advised to abandon Edwards. The Republicans would decimate an amateur such as he. It would be brutal.
Jason Zengerle