by Daniel Drezner

Thomas Bartlett's Chronicle of Higher Education one-act nonfiction playAcademic Bill Of RightsWhat's Liberal About The Liberal ArtsHabermas' theory of communicative action
Mr. Horowitz says he was nervous about meeting with Mr. Bérubé. "I didn't know if it was going to be the most unpleasant lunch I've ever had--just nastiness," he says. "I feel like the invisible man. I get these attacks that compare me to Stalin, McCarthy, when there's nothing I do to warrant a charge like that." But he was surprised. "We had a really good time," Mr. Horowitz says. "I would lunch with him again if that Michael showed up." Mr. Bérubé was also concerned that the lunch could turn ugly and was pleased it did not. "It was more civil and edifying than one could reasonably expect," Mr. Bérubé says. That said, the Penn State professor hasn't let his guard down. "I meant it when I said we don't trust him." Mr. Horowitz says he doesn't regret including Mr. Bérubé among the most dangerous professors in the country because he "has dug in his heels in defending a university which is increasingly becoming a platform for indoctrinating people in left-wing views." Asked whether he will treat Mr. Horowitz more gently on his blog in the future, Mr. Bérubé replies, "Oh, I don't know about that."
Mr. Horowitz's stinging defeat at the hands of the Republican-controlled state legislature in PennsylvaniaClick here to see more from Bérubé on the lunch