I am still marvelling over the joint federal income tax returns of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton. Of course, what is most surprising is that he made roughly $50 million talking about himself. Which, first of all, if you can judge by his speaking during the campaign about both himself and her, the truth quotient must have been very low. Well, ok, the Gulf Arabs were cheated. 

Which suggests perhaps a more important topic right out of their tax filings. What if she, by the most unlikely of circumstances, actually wins the nomination and then wins the election? Surely, Bill won't behave like Dennis Thatcher did and simply leave the limelight to her. Can anyone imagine that? So on whose payroll will he remain? And for whom will he speak at $250,000 a talk?

But the rest of my meditation is not speculation. And it's actually just a postscript to the Clinton 1040.

Still, it has a lot to do with the Clinton pension, twisted into something so much more than was ever intended. Then the payments by the feds for his lavish expenses and his lavish pension.

This is not just my pencil calculations on a notepad.

All of this was calculated by Edward A Zelinsky, an eminent professor of tax law at Cardozo School of Law. In many ways, it's more outrageous that even Bill's income. Take a look.