First, there was West Virginia. Michael Crowley parsed Hillary's thinking going into the primary, noting that West Virginia is the place Bill belongs. Hillary won, and Noam said the numbers vindicate John Judis. But Josh Patashnik thought losing in Indiana might have softened the blow--and Chris Orr thought Obama probably had something more in store.

He did, of course. Chris was on to the John Edwards endorsement early, which Crowley declared risk-free for Edwards and mostly symbolic. Noam worried it might hurt Obama in Kentucky, and rumors abounded about possible appointments.

Then, the Republican Party imploded, visibly. Eve Fairbanks teed up the rout in Mississippi, and watched Republicans shank it into the hills. Josh talked about the implications, while Noam noted that attacks on Obama drove the GOP loss, and measured their disarray.

Hilariously, Republicans followed up by adopting a slogan from an antidepressant company--a choice that aligns with John Boehner's leadership style. Eve announced TNR's own rebranding contest, and debated the benefits of Congressional comity with Josh.

During that time, McCain managed to break his principles on global warming, the G.I. Bill, and taking money from evil regimes.

George Bush accused Obama of appeasement at the Knesset. Chris said it was good for Obama and Noam thought it deeply ironic. Then Bush denied he was talking about Obama and Jamie Kirchick asked what was wrong with Bush's statements--causing Chait to hit back.

McCain chimed in, inviting more charges of hypocrisy, and Josh grew disgusted with Chris Matthews's coverage of the issue. Noam thought Obama's response was shrewd and I said it was rhetorically sound.

Finally, California legalized gay marriage. Crowley parsed McCain's record on the issue, and Jeffrey Rosen weighed in. What a week!

--Barron YoungSmith