In Washington, you can spend decades as bitter ideological opponents but still find common cause in the name of cashing in:

The nation's largest insurers, hospitals and medical groups have hired more than 350 former government staff members and retired members of Congress in hopes of influencing their old bosses and colleagues, according to an analysis of lobbying disclosures and other records.

The tactic is so widespread that three of every four major health-care firms have at least one former insider on their lobbying payrolls, according to The Washington Post's analysis.

Nearly half of the insiders previously worked for the key committees and lawmakers, including Sens. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), debating whether to adopt a public insurance option opposed by major industry groups. At least 10 others have been members of Congress, such as former House majority leaders Richard K. Armey (R-Tex.) and Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.), both of whom represent a New Jersey pharmaceutical firm. [emphasis added]

Here's Gephardt in 2002, railing against the "drug companies" behind the House GOP's Medicare prescription drug bill: "It's a total capitulation to special interests!" Much like Gephardt's post-Congressional career. 

--Michael Crowley