Last year, during the Beijing Olympics, we profiled nine Chinese citizens who had been incarcerated for their political beliefs. Today, the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, seems like a good time to remember their stories. Click on each name for more details.

Liu Jie
Ironically, her likely transgression was writing a public letter that urged the 17th CCP Congress to abolish the type of labor camps in which she's currently detained.

Liu Shaokun
After China's devastating earthquake in May, Liu, a teacher, posted online photographs of collapsed schools in the city of Deyang. The government's public security bureau in Deyang has accused Liu of "deliberately inciting families of victims to petition and disseminating anti-government rumours."

Wang Xiaoning
Wang was arrested in September 2002 for publishing a pro-democracy and anti-corruption online journal, and for writing and distributing essays and electronic journals on democracy and other political topics.

Huang Qi
In June of 1998, Huang and his wife started a website, 64tianwang.com, devoted to tracking down the victims of human trafficking.

Hada
Hada was jailed for "inciting separatism" and "espionage," and is rumored to have become quite sick in prison.

Dolma Kyab
Dolma was sentenced to 10 years in prison in 2005 for "endangering state security."

Qi Chonghuai
According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, Qi was originally detained in June 2007 for holding a false press card, then was charged with the more serious crimes of fraud and extortion on the last day allowed by the statute of limitations.

Hu Shigen
Established pro-democracy party and planned public memorials to commemorate the Chinese government's violent suppression of democratic protests in 1989.

Ye Guozhu
Asked for official permission to demonstrate against forced evictions in Beijing in connection with the city's preparation for the 2008 Olympics.

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