Let's take seriously for a moment the argument that it would be wrong to pass health care now because the voters of Massachusetts have "sent a message" that they want to stop reform.  Massachusetts is an odd state because it actually has a form of health care similar to what the Congress has proposed. It's highly popular in Massachusetts, supported by a thirty point margin. In fact, Scott Brown voted for that reform.

Brown's argument as to why he opposes bringing a similar model to other states is purely local (via the Lowell Sun):

Why should we in Massachusetts subsidize what other states should be doing? I have to be a little parochial.

So, okay. The Massachusetts voters endorsed this vision: We're got ours, and we don't want to pay for anybody else to enjoy this great system we have. So why should the rest of the country feel bound to heed this decision?