Troubles with voter registration have been some of the most common today—many of them involving students.

  • In South Carolina, Common Cause, an organization run by former Congressman Bob Edgar, D-Pennsylvania, has received reports that students at Benedict College in Columbia, South Carolina were not allowed to vote because their voter registration addresses did not match the addresses on their driver’s licenses.
     
  • A similar problem has also surfaced in Michigan, where a group of University of Michigan law students—election protection volunteers—discovered that some of their University of Michigan classmates were turned away because the state of Michigan automatically changed their addresses to match their driver’s licenses instead of their University of Michigan address.

So far, 102 reports of voter intimidation have already come in today, which the folks here say is particularly high, though they have not been able to draw a comparison to 2008.

  • In Woodland Park, Colorado, a town north of Colorado Springs, someone had posted a sign saying that Democrats vote on Wednesday. Election protection notified officials, and the sign has now been taken down.
     
  • Similarly, monitors at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) received reports that one group sent out a deceptive mailing in Spanish, telling voters that election day was November 3.
     
  • And another member of the Election Protection coalition reported that there was a person intimidating voters at the armory park precinct in Tuscon, Arizona by videotaping them at the polling place.