The Washington Examiner has an editorial demanding that the National Labor Relations Board "crack down" on union thuggery. Here are a few of the Examiner's examples of the union tactics the NLRB should crack down upon:

Stage regular mass visits or sit-ins...
Organize constant telephone calls...
Use friends and allies in government to generate costly legal and regulatory pressure
Plant negative stories about the union and its officials with local media...
Promise informants protection from retaliation for providing "dirt"...
leafleting outside meetings where [executives] are speaking, their homes, or events sponsored by community organizations they are tied to are some ways to make sure their friends, neighbors, and associates are aware of the controversy

Now, obviously the Examiner casts every one of these activities in the most sinister possible terms. But they're all, in fact, what most people would consider the exercise of basic political rights. The Examiner is actually calling on the federal government to stop things like providing information to reporters, distributing leaflets, petitioning the government to alter regulations, and organizing public protests:

The more important controversy will come if the NLRB does nothing to crack down on this kind of activity by a union that spent millions of dollars to elect President Obama.

Freedom!