Joe Raedle/Getty

Are we finally done with October surprises?

Technically, yes. Obviously. Yesterday was Halloween, today is November 1, which means that the month of October has passed and will not come again for 11 months, assuming the world does not end one week from today.

But the final hours of October were treated with the kind of rush you sometimes see at last call. First, it was reported late Monday afternoon that the FBI had “concluded” that Russia was trying to influence the election, but had decided not to publicize the information because it could run the risk of the FBI influencing the election. Then came reports that a secret server in Trump Tower might be communicating with Russia, that the FBI was investigating former Trump campaign chief Paul Manafort’s ties to Russia, and that a spy had given the FBI information that showed that Trump had been cultivated by the Russian government for five years, that it was regularly feeding Trump intelligence, and that it had “compromised” him in order to “blackmail” him. (The Times reports that the FBI did not find a “clear link” between Trump and Russia.)

If you accept that Russia is trying to influence the election, the common thread in all of these stories is that Trump may be more complicit in that intervention than previously assumed—that he is something more than a patsy. But, even in aggregate, it’s not especially convincing. There’s at least a kernel of truth in each of these stories, but there’s a lot of speculation, too. Right now there are a lot of dots, but very few of them are connected.

The greater significance seems to be that FBI Director James Comey’s announcement on Friday that the FBI was looking into a new trove of Hillary Clinton emails it found while investigating Anthony Weiner seems to have opened up a Pandora’s Box of leaked FBI stories—the exact outcome that Comey was likely trying to prevent. That’s one reason why, even if October is over, the surprises may still keep coming.