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The 2015 Hollywood Blacklist is here, and as usual, the best movies are the ones that haven’t been made.

The Revenant, Spotlight and The End of the Tour were on the list last year, Variety reports, so it’s likely we’ll see many of these on the awards circuit next year. Here’s a few I’m looking forward to, and a few I hope stay blacklisted forever.

WOULD WATCH

PALE BLUE DOT by Brian C Brown, Elliot DiGuisseppi

Twelve months after returning from a space mission, decorated astronaut Laura Pepper is arrested for the attempted murder of a fellow astronaut.

This was the greatest news story of 2007 and it will be the Best Picture of 2017.

REAGAN by Mike Rosolio

When Ronald Reagan falls into dementia at the start of his second term, an ambitious intern is tasked with convincing the commander in chief that he is an actor playing the president in a movie.

Only acceptable if this is directed by Spike Jonze perched on top Michel Gondry’s shoulders.

BARE KNUCKLE by Dave Matillo

New York City 1862: The bare knuckle boxing champion, Bad Jack, develops a crush on a common French girl and uses his political influence to send her Irish lumberman husband off to the Civil War so he can take her for his own. Unfortunately for Bad Jack, the Irishman doesn’t die in the war and comes back a killer looking to exact revenge on the pugilist and his entire corrupt entourage.

via GIPHY

PASS

FINAL JOURNEY by Michael Lee Barlin.

A mistreated elderly Inuit woman is forced out of her village to survive alone on the savage arctic tundra.

The year’s most depressing film! Co-directed by Michael Haneke and Lars von Trier.

SENIOR YEAR by Andrew Knauer, Arthur Pielli

A cheerleader wakes up after a twenty year coma and returns to sit at the cool table and try to become prom queen, as a thirty seven year-old woman.

Ban all men (from Hollywood.)

HARD PASS

I BELIEVE IN AMERICA by Terry Clyne

A behind-the-scenes look at the making of THE GODFATHER, revealing that the creative forces behind one of the finest American films ever made were all as cunning and ruthless as the mobsters portrayed in Mario Puzo’s bestseller.

FRANCIS AND THE GODFATHER by Andrew Farotte

Facing financial ruin, auteur filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola is forced to direct the adaptation of Mario Puzo’s pulp novel The Godfather, pitting him against legendary mega-producer Robert Evans.

I like The Godfather! But ban all men forever.